Brad Alles

Brad Alles is an Assistant Professor of Education at Concordia University Wisconsin. He graduated from Concordia University Nebraska with a Bachelor’s degree in education, and received his Master’s degree in Christian education from Concordia University Chicago.

Posts by Brad Alles

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Do worldview maps show you right & wrong?

What is right and wrong?  How do we decide?  Is there anything wrong with anything?  As we continue to examine worldview components, we come upon their ethical stance.  All worldviews have beliefs about how to live. Recall that according to atheism, no God exists. Furthermore, Secular Humanism believes that there is no supernatural realm, just [&hellip

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What does the worldview map show?

Let’s continue to discuss the components of a worldview. All worldviews have beliefs about reality and the source of everything. Another term for this is a philosophy. Some believe in naturalism—the belief that reality is only comprised of matter, or natural things, with no supernatural realm. Everything that exists is just what we see in [&hellip

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Where does the worldview map start?

Continuing from the last blog about worldviews: If a worldview is the truth claims that explain the world and reality, like a map, what are these specific claims? First, all begin with religious or philosophical assumptions—even if they claim not to. If we do not grasp this fact, we miss a key witnessing opportunity when [&hellip

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What is a worldview?

If you want to defend the Christian faith to anyone, whether they are a Muslim or an atheist, you need to understand their worldview. A worldview is the truth claims that explain the world and reality. It helps people make sense of the world, like a map, so they can navigate through life. The worldview [&hellip

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Does suffering prove that God doesn’t exist?

Earlier I wrote about how the Liam Neeson film The Grey is an atheist parable showing that suffering proves that God doesn’t exist.  This week the high school where I teach, Milwaukee Lutheran, experienced incredible suffering–one of our sophomores died in her sleep. This girl, an active dance squad and track team member, went to bed and [&hellip

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Defending the faith–how to do it (part 2)

When I wrote earlier about defending the Christian faith, I mentioned that what we say (content) is important, but so is how we say it (delivery).  I read a blog recently by John Stonestreet that spoke to that very issue.  (“Against the World, Part 2” http://www.summit.org/blogs/the-point/against-the-world-part-2/ ) Besides what Mr. Stonestreet suggests, may I suggest another [&hellip

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Defending the faith at the movies

Yesterday I read an interesting blog reviewing the new Liam Neeson film The Grey.  (“The Grey: Liam Neeson’s bleak atheist parable” http://www.breakpoint.org/tp-home/blog-archives/blog-archives/entry/4/18673 ) In it, blogger Shane Morris points out that the film isn’t so much a movie about man vs. nature as it is a movie about man vs. God.  Or, more specifically,  man vs. the [&hellip

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Defending the faith–how to do it

Apologetics is defending beliefs and actions. As Christians defend the faith, explaining why we believe in Jesus as Savior, what we say is important—the content of our apologetics must be solid. We must know the facts and be armed with knowledge. However, that is just one part of the defense. The other part of the [&hellip

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Apologetics? What is that?

Christians believe that Jesus is the Savior of the world, the promised Messiah.  Are you a Christian?  If someone asked you why you were a Christian, what would you say? Would you say that you’re a Christian because you were raised that way, or would you say you’re a Christian because you “just believe it”? [&hellip

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Why I decided to write a book

I have been teaching high school religion in two Lutheran high schools for twenty-four years.  During that time, I have been invited to speak in seventeen states to speak on various topics to youth and youth workers.  Everywhere I go, people have the same basic questions.  I have found that young people want to study [&hellip

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