Brad Alles

Brad Alles is an Assistant Professor of Education at Concordia University Wisconsin. He graduated from Concordia University Nebraska with a Bachelor’s degree in education, and received his Master’s degree in Christian education from Concordia University Chicago.

Posts by Brad Alles

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Christianity’s Contributions: Slavery abolished (Part 3)

Thanks to the influence of the Christian faith, slavery was abolished in cultures throughout the world.  The seeds of this idea were planted in the New Testament.  Remember that slavery in the Roman empire was not the same as slavery in the New World.  Slaves did the jobs of professionals today–teachers, actors, secretaries, and the [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Slavery abolished (Part 2)

As we continue to examine the impact of Christianity on culture, one of the most enduring is the abolition of slavery.  What is surprising to many is that the Bible allows slavery in the Old and New Testament.  Why was it permissible?  Let’s focus on the Old Testament. If someone was owed money, God’s people, [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Slavery abolished (Part 1)

Another aspect of Christianity’s contributions is the abolition of slavery due to Christianity.  All cultures have had slavery through time, but only one religion helped remove it from culture: Christianity. Through history, slavery was common due to the consequences of war.  These slaves were actually prisoners of war, but instead of being imprisoned, they were [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Justice served (Part 4)

As we close this series on the benefits of Christianity in the realm of law and justice, let’s address the issue of “church and state.”  In Matthew 22:21, Jesus says to “Give to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and to God what is God’s.”  It was from this (nad other verses) that Martin Luther derived his concept of [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Justice served (Part 3)

Continuing our focus on law and the benefits that Christianity brought to the world, let’s look at individual rights.  Political, economic, and religious freedom stem from an individual’s rights.  Recall that in the Christian worldview, these are God-given, not government-given rights.  (John Locke (1632-1704) would write that natural rights are given by nature, not government, and [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Justice served (Part 2)

As we continue to examine Christianity’s influence on culture in the specifics of law and justice, let’s focus on our founding documents, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Examining the wording of the Declaration reveals a clear Christian influence.  The Declaration speaks of the “Law of Nature and Nature’s God.”  This phrase comes from [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Justice served (Part 1)

Another aspect of Christianity’s contributions to society is in the realm of law and justice.   Not only did the Bible provide the Gospel of salvation, but it had a legal framework for the Israelites to use.  Christians would use these concepts in their legal systems for other nations as well. Natural law is the idea [&hellip

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Christianity Contributions: Science employed (Part 4)

As we close out this month’s blogs on the benefits that Christianity brought to the world in terms of scientific advancement, let’s focus on chemistry and medicine.  Some of the great contributors in these fields are well known to us; others are unfamiliar.  All of them were Christian. Robert Boyle’s (1627-1691) work in chemistry earned him [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Science employed (Part 3)

Continuing our focus on how Christianity changed the world with the Gospel and with culture, we examine the famous scientists who were Christian.  Rather than having an antagonistic attitude toward scientific discovery because of their faith, these Christians sought to understand the orderly creation that God had made.  Let’s examine astronomy and physics as two [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Science employed (Part 2)

Scientific study flourished because of Christianity.  Rather than being an obstacle, the Church had great thinkers who advanced science.  Here are a few. When trying to solve a problem, William Occam (1280-1349) believed that we should choose the explanation with the fewest assumptions. Francis Bacon (1561-1626) developed the scientific method.  This used inductive reasoning, or [&hellip

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