Christianity’s Contributions

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Christianity’s Contributions: Justice served (Part 2)

As we continue to examine Christianity’s influence on culture in the specifics of law and justice, let’s focus on our founding documents, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Examining the wording of the Declaration reveals a clear Christian influence.  The Declaration speaks of the “Law of Nature and Nature’s God.”  This phrase comes from [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Justice served (Part 1)

Another aspect of Christianity’s contributions to society is in the realm of law and justice.   Not only did the Bible provide the Gospel of salvation, but it had a legal framework for the Israelites to use.  Christians would use these concepts in their legal systems for other nations as well. Natural law is the idea [&hellip

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Christianity Contributions: Science employed (Part 4)

As we close out this month’s blogs on the benefits that Christianity brought to the world in terms of scientific advancement, let’s focus on chemistry and medicine.  Some of the great contributors in these fields are well known to us; others are unfamiliar.  All of them were Christian. Robert Boyle’s (1627-1691) work in chemistry earned him [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Science employed (Part 3)

Continuing our focus on how Christianity changed the world with the Gospel and with culture, we examine the famous scientists who were Christian.  Rather than having an antagonistic attitude toward scientific discovery because of their faith, these Christians sought to understand the orderly creation that God had made.  Let’s examine astronomy and physics as two [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Science employed (Part 2)

Scientific study flourished because of Christianity.  Rather than being an obstacle, the Church had great thinkers who advanced science.  Here are a few. When trying to solve a problem, William Occam (1280-1349) believed that we should choose the explanation with the fewest assumptions. Francis Bacon (1561-1626) developed the scientific method.  This used inductive reasoning, or [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Science employed (Part 1)

Our exploration of the contributions that Christianity has made to culture continues with an examination of the field of science.  Contrary to popular opinion, Christians are not anti-science.  As a matter of fact, the scientific method developed nowhere else but Christian Europe. The Christian worldview starts with the following assumptions: 1) God exists and is [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Labor dignified (Part 3)

As we close out thoughts on the Christian influence on work and the dignity it provides, a biblical worldview regarding property rights and freedom is in order as well. The Bible tells us clearly that money isn’t the root of all evil; the love of money is a root of evil (1 Timothy 6:10).  It [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Labor dignified (Part 2)

As we continue our examination of the benefits of the Christian faith for all humanity, this month’s focus is on work.  A biblical perspective is that work is ordained by God and is good, whether it is labor done with your hands or head.  No work is menial or insignificant, nor beneath people in God’s [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Labor dignified (Part 1)

The contributions that Christianity has made to the world is profound.  Often we don’t  even realize it.  Let’s turn our attention to the area of work.  Going back to the Greco-Roman world of the New Testament, manual labor was only for the lower class and slaves.   Although slaves received a small subsistence allowance and eventually [&hellip

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Christianity’s Contributions: Schools started (Part 4)

This month’s blogs close out the series with a focus on the Church’s impact on education.  Let’s examine the universities started by believers. Benedictine monks, from 528 AD on,  collected books, copied manuscripts, and required the reading of certain manuscripts in their institutions.  But the first official university was the University of Bologna, in Italy .  It [&hellip

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